June 21, 2012

When we returned to our campsite tonight after a tram ride to whistler peak, guess who came to dinner? A whole bunch of mama Elks and their children.  These guys were as big as horses and absolutely gorgeous.  Apparently our campsite was the dinner spot chosen for the night.

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There are signs posted everywhere about not feeding the animals or getting too close, okay it is a given that you don’t mess with the wild animals.  So what is a person to do?  We’re surrounded and we were told by a neighbor camper to keep the dog inside because mother Elk will stampede if their young were threatened.  Very quietly, I took my trusty Canon and got some pretty good shots.  Then we all ate our dinner peacefully, the Elk munching on bushes around our site and we munching on our not so great spaghetti dinner at the picnic table among them.

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All around the park, and all the parks in the National Forest area, are posted beware bears signs. I think my last trip to the washroom was in bright daylight, an hour ago!  We don’t have bear spray, and never heard of it until now.

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Earlier in the day we spotted a few of these spectacular black bear ambling so very slowly in the middle of the road with no apparent awareness or regard for the vehicles behind them, their shiny black coats reflecting the early morning light. The light, I can’t get over the light. Image

Then this afternoon on our way back from Maligne Lake, was another bear spotting, a mama bear and baby bear snacking near the same road, when suddenly appeared a line of cars pulled over to the side of the road, just like our Safari experience in Africa except the onlookers had no respect for the animals nor regard for the park regulations. People got out of their cars for photos, up close and personal, like it was Lion Country Safari or something,.  Seriously, It is a miracle a human wasn’t mauled. This is the one time I was so glad that Mocha started barking.  The bears ran off and a dozen or more very P.O’ed individuals gave us the “stink eye” muttering the dog scared them off.  Ha!  The dog saved your life, sleeze bags!

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Leaving camp early has it’s advantages, one can view animals feed in the early morning and early evening, although it is just dusk right now and the time is already 9:15 p.m. We are finding it difficult to adjust to the long days. This morning on our way to Maligne Lake, a beautiful fuzzy antlered Caribou that turned out to be a Elk buck (whoops) stuck his nose out of the forest  while nibbling on fresh tree shoots and lichen.

Apparently, the Caribou and Moose population is declining Canada we felt privileged to view one.

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While I have wifi, I thought you would enjoy the photos.

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